Thursday, May 2, 2013

Where We Are Now

Back in December of last year we talked about all the things we had planned and we were a bit over zealous in our timelines. Moving a very large flash project over to Javascript is by no means an easy task.

What we have noted is that over the last two years our mobile traffic has went up to nearly 10% of our over all traffic. With this is mind as we are doing our rebuild, we are constantly checking things out to make sure they work properly on tablets. We actually have an initial API out in the wild that we are testing with some initial clients. The ultimate goal of our API is to allow any web developer to implement Scribble Maps drawing technology. We have also been really focused on creating an experience that is similar, if not better, in quality to our current flash application experience. Further we want our API to work with currently existing APIs such as Google, Bing, and Mapbox.

Thanks to our amazing VIP supporters, we now have some resources that is starting to give us more freedom to focus solely on Scribble Maps. The first thing we are hoping to do is replace our current mobile site, which is only just a map viewer, with the first implementation of or javascript editor. Once we have let that run for awhile and are confident in its stability, we will start showing that editor in place of the flash application for those with modern browsers.

Since we are doing a complete rebuild we are also focusing on starting to prepare and implement things people have been asking for. One of those things is true collaborative mapping. Right now if you share the editor password multiple people can make changes to the same map. The problem is if people work on the map at the same time, they might write override the changes by others. Building in collaborative mapping will also set the stage to allow us to do something we have always wanted to do which is real-time map editing by multiple parties.

We're sorry for the delays, we get a lot of emails by developers asking when our technology will be available and so it does bother us that it is taking so long, but we don't want to roll out something that is too unstable to be usable.

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