Posts

Create Island Polygons (Donut Holes) and Merge Polygons

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In the world there are a lot of situations where you have shapes with holes in them. The one that stands out as a very common one is the pentagon. However, there is a lot of other situations where you might want a hole in a polygon such as a polygon representing all the water around an island. In Scribble Maps you can easily create polygons with holes and then even use these polygons to filter your existing layers. Let's imagine you wanted all the points that are inside of a particular ring, you could do this using a polygon with holes. The other advantage of using holes in polygons is you can create sequential rings that will all have the same opacity which is particularly useful if you are trying to make a delivery fee map. In this post we are going to go over quickly how to make a hole in a polygon and also go over some use cases. We will also be talking about merging polygons  because this often goes hand in hand with creating polygons with holes. Creating Donut Holes To cut a

Travel Time Polygon Enhancement

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We have added two new styles hex tile and square tile to the travel polygon functionality. We have also added the ability to create travel polygon based on distance. If you are familiar with this operation, you can hop right in. If you are new to Scribble Maps, read on for an explanation of how to create your own travel polygon. There are different names for it including isochrone maps, travel time polygons, and drive time radius but regardless of the name it serves the same purpose. It's a shape that identifies areas with a shared attribute such as what is within a ten minute walk or drive. With Scribble Maps we allow you to make these travel polygons easily. We have two different modes one for time, and one for distance. Time is useful when you want to be able to figure out what is within a certain travel time of a particular point. Distance allows you to figure out how much distance is travelled which is useful for things like insurance. To create a travel time polygon or drive

Route Optimization Comes to Scribble Maps

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Route optimization also known as the travelling sales person problem (TSP) is a type of routing to figure out which order you should visit locations in the fastest time possible. As you can imagine this is very useful if you need to drop off packages, do movie location scouting, make sales calls to a physical location, or need to do routine inspections. Well we are happy to announce that this functionality has now come to Scribble Maps. For demonstration purpose we have selected a bunch of different cafes in the Toronto region. Let's pretend that in the course of a day or multiple days you want to visit all of them. Here is a picture of the original points. Unoptimized Points From here we going to go to our Operations & Analysis panel and select Create > Optimized Route. Next you will want to select your start location, end location, and the way points folder that contains the points in your route. After clicking "Create Optimized Route" your

Growing Pains and Corona

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For the last few days we you might of noted that Scribble Maps has not performing like it usually does. We are used to high volume situations it happens regularly but when a map was used to show the locations of Corona Virus cases in Italy on a large Italian news site we got hit with traffic we had never seen before. Serious traffic. So serious we waited to capture this milestone. It's unfortunate that this milestone was caused by something like the Corona virus and we wish we would of hit this milestone for something else. This couldn't of came at a worse time because we were in the middle of doing infrastructure updates and we were about to deploy an update right before this hit. We provide unlimited map views for our widgets so there was nothing stopping the traffic. Our map would go on to be seen by over a million people. This was a learning experience for us so over the last couple weeks we have pulled some over time and not only did complete re-writes to handle th

Data Aggregation By Region

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An often needed ability is to be able to combine or aggregate data for a region. For example being able to find the combined sales or averages sales of sales people in a particular region. With Scribble Maps this easily done using operations. To get started you need two things present on your maps. #1 Markers with attributes You can upload these markers through our import list feature and the column values will be automatically added to each marker as attributes. You can also manually add attributes directly to a markers but this is not recommended if you are using large data sets. #2 Region(s) A region is nothing more than a shape (polygon). You can either draw them directly on the map, add them via a KML file, or use our region highlighter tool. Aggregate That Data! First go to the operations panel and then select either "In region" or "In multiple regions" in the aggregate column. Next, select the group containing the regions you want to

Data Filtering with Scribble Maps

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We recently rolled out a large new feature to Scribble Maps called Data filtering. This allows you to quickly filter spreadsheets such as XLS, CVS, or just attributes you add yourself. To those unfamiliar with data filtering and GIS it might be a bit intimidating at first but data filtering is nothing more than showing data that you want to see based on specific conditions. We use data filtering all the time for ourselves. For instance when we are picking a hotel and want to see the ones with the highest ratings or ones that are in a certain price range. Both of these are examples of data filtering. The cool thing about Data Filtering in Scribble Maps is that once you define filters they can be used on our share view by others. When others are viewing your map they can turn on and off filters for the map to get to the data they are looking for. In order to filter data in Scribble Maps an overlay such as a marker or a shape needs to have an attribute. Attributes can either be ad

Using WMS Layers With Scribble Maps

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Web Map Services (WMS) are a way of sharing geo data across many platforms. Usually using WMS requires a lot of skill or advanced GIS tools but with Scribble Maps you can add them quickly and easily to your map. If you are a GIS professional you can use Scribble Maps to quickly layer WMS layers on the map and then even add your annotations on top. For this post we are going to use  https://www.weather.gov/gis/WebServices  which is repository of government weather data. First select the layer you want to add to Scribble Maps. Next, Click "WMS" Next You will want to copy the entire WMS URL. Now visit the Scribble Maps editor add click the "+" button in the bottom right next to Base Layers. Next select "Add WMS" Now paste your URL into "WMS URL" select your layer and then hit "Add WMS Layer" Close the window and you will now see the WMS layer added to your Scribble Map! The great part of WMS layer